Will colored light help for dyslectic kids?

Dyslexia: News from the web:

A group of Tauranga Girls’ College students have come up with an idea that could help dyslexic students – and save them hundreds of dollars.

The Year 13 girls have formed a company for this year’s Young Enterprise Scheme called Brite and are preparing to launch their product, the iBrite.

It’s a little LED device that sits at the top of a student’s page of work, shining coloured light over the text. The idea is that the different lighting helps those with dyslexia process words better.

We have heard various opinions on the approach with colored overlays or like here with colored light. but if it helps you this looks like a good option.

Read all about it HERE

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The Orton-Gillingham approach explained

Dyslexia: News from the web:

The Orton-Gillingham approach is a tried-and-true sequential approach to learning to read, geared for beginning readers and those who have difficulty with reading, writing and spelling, such as those children with dyslexia.

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Kids with dyslexia more prone to social, emotional problems

Dyslexia: News from the web:

Children with dyslexia are more likely to encounter a range of social and emotional difficulties – such as feelings of anxiety, depression and low self-esteem – than their peers.

And having strong social support networks may help to buffer them against such negative outcomes.

These were the main findings of a study by the University College London (UCL), based on responses of 99 Primary 3 pupils with dyslexia across 13 primary schools here.

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My Turn: A father’s hope after daughter’s dyslexia diagnosis

Dyslexia: News from the web:

Three years ago, I didn’t feel I deserved the handcrafted gift my 8-year-old daughter made me for Fathers Day. It had been a rough school year for her. Her teachers had noted she wasn’t reading at the level of her classmates. This prompted the school to provide a reading specialist who told us that she would catch up if she worked harder and focused more. Wanting to do the right thing, I pushed her to work harder.

We ran through flash cards in the car, while we set the table for dinner and before she went to bed. She spent extra time on homework every night. Still she wasn’t making progress. All the added pressure was straining our relationship, and I felt like I had let her down. I started dreading the flash card drill sessions.

Read all about it HERE

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