Parents get involved in Dyslexia education

Dyslexia: News from the web:

Fewer than 40 percent of fourth and eighth grade students nationwide are proficient readers. Now, led by parents of children with dyslexia, a learning disability that makes reading and spelling difficult, some states are trying to change how reading is taught. Special correspondent Lisa Stark reports from Arkansas, where a group of determined advocates have upended traditional reading instruction.

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Leonardo and Dyslexia

Dyslexia: News from the web:

Leonardo da Vinci was an atrocious speller, a sure sign of dyslexia, but it’s possible that very disorder fueled his genius, a researcher says.

May 2 marks the 500th anniversary of the death of da Vinci, an inventor and artist regarded by many as the most creative person ever known.

“Dyslexia is probably one of the things that made da Vinci so creative, made him Leonardo,” said researcher Dr. Salvatore Mangione, an associate professor in the department of medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.

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Dyslexia in prison

Dyslexia: News from the web:


No national studies have been done to show the prevalence of dyslexia among prisoners, but the little research that exists at the state level suggests the rates are quite high: A 2000 study of Texas prisoners found that about half were likely dyslexic, and about two-thirds struggled with reading comprehension.

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New dyslexia app

Dyslexia: News from the web:

West Branch senior Cassie Madison was presented with the Congressional App Challenge award by U.S. Rep. Bill Johnson. Madison, shown with Johnson, created Dysulator, to help students with dyslexia, like herself. She created the app through Android Studio using kotlin code. Madison hopes “parents and teachers can use this app to understand dyslexics and make a positive change in our future.” Her app has three main components: an dyslexia tab, an interactive game simulator and a help and support tab. The game simulator attempts to recreate how a dyslexic person would see and feel throughout a game. Madison is one of four students from Ohio who were selected as winners.

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