The Fonz, now best selling author with dyslexia

Dyslexia: News from the web:

You may know Henry Winkler as The Fonz from Happy Days or the “very good” Bluth family lawyer from Arrested Development. Or perhaps, more recently, for his Emmy-winning role as the eccentric acting coach Gene Cousineau on the HBO comedy series Barry.

But what Winkler is most proud of is, he says, may be his least recognized body of work: his best-selling children’s book series Here’s Hank, which follows the adventures and struggles of a dyslexic kid named Hank Zipzer. Winkler, who has dyslexia himself, pulls from his own experiences to write the series along with Lin Oliver.

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3D Printing Tools for Treating Dyslexia

Dyslexia: News from the web:

Dyslexia is not an uncommon disorder, and it affects only writing, not speech or any other aspect of life. It is frequently diagnosed in early childhood, and specialized teaching devices are used to treat it. In a paper entitled “Design and production of plastic parts for read-write didactic equipment using 3D printer,” a group of researchers discusses using 3D printing to design and produce parts of this teaching equipment.

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Dyslexia in Montana

Dyslexia: News from the web:

Montana is one of three states that has no laws relating to dyslexia, a disability that makes reading and sometimes writing difficult.

For state Sen. Cary Smith, R-Billings, who has a granddaughter diagnosed with dyslexia, the issue “is very close to me.”

Smith plans to introduce a bill or bills pertaining to dyslexia in the 2019 legislative session.

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Helping students with dyslexia

Dyslexia: News from the web:

Researchers estimate that dyslexia affects between 5 and 12 percent of the U.S. population — and as many as 80 percent of students who struggle with reading.

If you find that statistic startling, you’re not alone: It wasn’t until 2017 that New York State clarified that a diagnosis of dyslexia could be used in classifying students with a learning disability in order to determine eligibility for special education services and Individualized Education Programs (IEPs).

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